Federally Funded Wednesday – S&P About to Retest 2,640 as Fed Withdraws Stimulus

Yawn, are we there yet?

This is the same chart we were using since the beginning of February and, in March, the markets have been full of sound and fury which has signified nothing as all that bluster has us right back where we started, with the S&P 500 finishing yesterday's session at 2,716 – exactly 3 points higher than we were 30 days ago.  

When we did finally break out over the Strong Bounce Line at 2,728, the S&P flew all the way up to 2,800 (3/12 and 3/13) when I said we were going to short the S&P (/ES Futures) back to 2,400 and we hit 2,700 (up $5,000 per contract) on Monday and 2,720 is a weak bounce from that.  My comment on the overall market was:

"I said we plan on deploying more cash when the S&P drops to 2,400, which is 15% down from the current 2,800 but that includes people paying $1,600 for a share of Amazon (AMZN) that generated $4.56 in profit last year for a return of 0.285% – Japanese bond investors laugh at Amazon shareholders!  Come on folks, this is ridiculous – markets can't sustain these kinds of gains."  

Now you know what I meant by that comment – markets can't go up just because – there needs to be real money flowing in and a real economy to sustain it – we have neither of those things.  Yes, the economy is growing, but not fast enough to justify those kinds of market moves and that's why we have our 5% Lines™, especially our Must Hold Levels™ – to remind us where the REAL value is in the markets and that keeps us from losing our heads and chasing ridiculous valuations.  

It also tells us when things are too cheap and, just like there was a mania to buy stocks at sky-high valuations, there's a mania to sell perfectly good stocks like GE (GE), L Brands (LB) or Chipotle (CMG) at fire-sale prices – surprisingly in the midst of the same rally (see our March 12th Top Trade Review for those trade ideas). 

Even now, Amazon (AMZN) added back $41.50 (2.7%) yesterday as it retests $1,600,…
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