Thursday Thoughts – Tesla’s Emperor Musk Has No Clothes!

Our Tesla (TSLA) short is looking good!  

Despite releasing an earnings report that looks more like a sales brochure (and the CFO promptly quit, so he won't have to justify these numbers) it's pretty clear to investors that all is not well under the hood of the auto hobby shop.  You have to make much more than 8,000 vehicles a month to be considered an actual "manufacturer" – in 1914, with 13,000 employees, Ford (F) produced 300,000 Model Ts while TSLA's 13,058 employees have only managed to produce 75,000 cars (mostly the Model S) in their "amazingly automated" plant.  

You would think, 103 years after Ford invented the assembly line, that Tesla could do a little better but hey, give them a couple of more years and they might give the 1914 Model T a run for its money!  Given the shortfall in production (90,000 cars were promised for 2016) and the rapidly bleeding cash position, the departure of the CFO and the massive dilution of the shareholders (SCTY was given stock), we're very confident the $2,163 short we gave you yesterday will return the full $7,500 on March 17th (up 246% in less than 30 days) so you're welcome for that and happy St. Patrick's Day!  

Other than warning you not to buy the dip in TSLA, I've lost interest and am moving on.  Paulo Santos wrote a great article analyzing their earnings if you are interested, but we have bigger fish to fry now that we're done with Tesla – no sense beating a dead horse, even an electric one.  Just be aware that there are only 790 Super Charger sites in the US and that's 36% growth from last year – how do they get to 300,000 sales with that slow growth (and there are 114,533 gas stations)?

So, what else is going on in the World?  Well, we scored a nice win on Natural Gas Futures (/NGV7) from yesterday's live Trading Webinar with a nice $1,190 per contract gain for our Members – not bad for a half day's work, right?  

The weak Dollar is boosting all commodities this morning as it slumps back to 101, down 0.5%…
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